Using Graphic Novels in the Middle School Classroom

The term “graphic novel” was coined in the 1960s by writer and comic historian Richard Kyle. Until the last several years, the genre was fairly unknown outside the realm of comic book fans. There’s no concrete, widely accepted definition. Adding to the potential for confusion, the term is used for any book which uses comic-like illustrations to enhance the story. Though fiction books dominate graphic novel offerings, an increasing number of them are being published on nonfiction topics. The term “graphic novel” still applies even to these informational titles.

Making Overused School Assessments More Authentic

Over the course of teachers’ careers, there are times when they find themselves in a creative rut. Whether it’s a particularly dry topic or content that just isn’t igniting that creative pedagogical spark, it can be challenging at times to create engaging assessments for students.

How Students Can Benefit From Outdoor Learning

The development of Forest Schools originated in 1993 and is based on a Scandinavian principle that recognizes how important it is for children to come into contact with nature. Forest schools take standard learning activities outdoors for part of the day and may involve exploring the woods collecting treasures, starting a garden or creating a compost bin, building a camp or simply taking your normal lessons away from the classroom and outdoors for the day. Many school across the USA have added aspects of Forest schooling to their curriculum with an increasing number of organisations also pledging their involvement towards spreading awareness.

Thought-Provoking Podcasts That Will Make You a Better Educator

It can be easy to fall into a rut and let the same school routines, conversations, and initiatives box in your educational perspective. Podcasts are a great way to introduce fresh ideas and viewpoints into your educational diet that you otherwise may have missed.

How Special Education Teachers Can Advocate for Students

On October 20, 2017 the Education Department, led by Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, released a listed of 72 documents related to special education that were to be rescinded. The initial announcement framed the move as one that should relieve “unnecessary regulatory burdens.” Upon further inspection, though, most of those documents had expired, been replaced recently, or been overturned by new laws and policies. Unfortunately, that truth didn’t mend the growing rift between special education and disability advocates and the Education Department.

7 In-Class Activities to Improve Concentration in Children

Today, the attention spans of students is decreasing due to the amount of time they spend online or using a technology device like a tablet or a smartphone. The culprit is not the device itself, rather what kids learn from using this device.